The National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health
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Workforce Adequacy

Adolescent Medicine Training in Pediatric Residency Programs
by Harriette B. Fox, Margaret A. McManus, Jonathan D. Klein, Angela Diaz, Arthur B. Elster, Marianne E. Felice, David W. Kaplan, Charles J. Wibbelsman, and Jane E. Wilson. Pediatrics. 2010; 125: 165-172.
This article examines the adequacy of pediatric residency training in adolescent medicine. It addresses several aspects of training, including the extent to which important adolescent medicine topics are covered through formal education and practical application, the types of faculty involved in training, and the opportunities to establish ongoing therapeutic relationships with adolescents. Information for the study was obtained through a 2007 survey of pediatric residency program directors and adolescent medicine faculty.

Pediatricians' Interest in Expanding Services and Making Practice Changes to Improve the Care of Adolescents
by Harriette Fox, Margaret McManus, Karen O’Connor, Jonathan Klein, Angela Diaz, and Charles Wibbelsman, September 2009.
Based on a 2008 national survey of practicing pediatricians, this fact sheet examines pediatricians’ interest in adding or expanding preventive, mental health, and reproductive health services for adolescents if payment barriers were removed. It also identifies the specific practice and staffing changes they would have an interest in making, as well as the types of support and training they perceive would be most helpful to them in providing comprehensive primary care to adolescent.

Adolescent Medicine at the Crossroads: A Review of Fellowship Training and Recommendations for Reform
by Harriette B. Fox, Margaret A. McManus, Jane E. Wilson, Angela Diaz, Arthur B. Elster, Marianne E. Felice, David W. Kaplan, Jonathan D. Klein, and Charles J. Wibbelsman, April 2008.
This special report examines the current state of adolescent medicine fellowship programs. It contains information on the supply and recruitment of fellows; the nature and content of clinical, research, and leadership training; the institutional and financial challenges facing training programs today; and offers recommendations for building the field. Information was obtained primarily from a national survey of adolescent medicine fellowship program directors, along with key informant interviews, and an extensive literature review.

Advancing Medical Education Training in Adolescent Health
by Harriette B. Fox, Margaret A. McManus, Angela Diaz, Arthur B. Elster, Marianne E. Felice, David W. Kaplan, Jonathan D. Klein, and Jane E. Wilson. Pediatrics. 2008; 121: 1043-1045.
This commentary examines the strengths and weaknesses of four major options for establishing opportunities for training pediatricians in adolescent medicine. The options include extending the length of the mandatory adolescent medicine rotation, introducing more flexibility in residency programs to allow for formalized optional training tracks in adolescent medicine, creating a combined pediatrics/adolescent medicine residency, and increasing the availability of one-year adolescent medicine clinical training programs after completion of categorical training in general pediatrics. Information for this commentary was based on 2007 surveys of adolescent medicine fellowship program directors, pediatric residency program directors, and adolescent medicine faculty in pediatric residency programs.


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